Updated Canadian Dividend Stock Watchlist

Dividend Stocks

Canadian Dividend Stocks To Buy In 2020

It’s been a while since I’ve updated my watchlist. I haven’t made a stock purchase in a few months. In fact my last stock purchase was back in early March, right when Covid 19 was just starting to really hit North America. If you recall, I had added to my positions in XAW, GoEasy Financial, Chorus Aviation (ouch), Diversified Royalty and finally initiated a new position in New Flyer. I am still happy holding all of these companies long term and the only one that has taken a huge hit was Chorus Aviation.

I’ve increase my bi weekly contributions into my TFSA and although I haven’t purchased anything yet, I’ve had my eye on a few different companies. First a bit of background, so you can better understand my reasons for choosing the stocks below…

1) My RRSP holds mostly just 2 funds. One is XAW(which is about 40% of my total portfolio) and takes care of my USA/Global diversification and the other is an RBC Canadian Equity Income fund(About 25% of my total portfolio).

2) I use my TFSA specifically to hold Canadian Dividend Paying Stocks, so this watchlist will only include Canadian Stocks that pay a dividend.

3) Since about 25% of my portfolio is the RBC Canadian Dividend fund, I TRY to avoid holding the same stocks in my TFSA/RRSP. There are some exceptions (Algonquin Power, New Flyer, etc).

4) My updated watchlist will consist of Canadian Dividend paying stocks, and which meet my custom stock screening criteria. Some metrics I use in my custom stock screen are: Conservative Payout Ratio, Reasonable Price/Earnings, Earnings Growth & Expected Earnings Growth and Debt Levels.

Consumer Staples Stock(s):

Metro & Loblaw

Looking at these two stocks, I don’t believe you can go wrong with either. I would actually like to add them both, however right now I am leaning towards Metro. The only areas where Loblaw comes out on top is:
a) I am extremely familiar with it, I shop there multiple times a month.
b) Current dividend yield is slightly higher, slightly less volatility.

That said, the numbers speak for themselves, and I believe the first one I pick up will be Metro. See for yourself…

Metro looks like the clear winner here. They are trading at a better multiple, they have a much more conservative payout ratio (more room to grow the dividend), and the past 5 years show they are doing just that.


My target price for these stocks are:
Metro: $51.00
Loblaw:$61.00

Financial Stocks


The big banks are all well covered in my RBC Canadian Equity fund, so I will not talk about them here (although I will see, they pretty much all look like great pick ups right about now). I ALMOST grabbed some Bank of Nova Scotia last week when it was trading at 9x earnings. It is still trading under 10x earnings and yielding 6.13%!

I’ve been watching First National & Canadian Western Bank for years. In fact I owned CWB for a while, bought it at $19, sold it around $30. It is a stock that continually has good metrics, but also has crazy volatility usually tied to the Alberta market and oil prices. That said they have diversified away from being a “western” bank and continue to expand. If you don’t like volatility, it’s probably not for you, but it’s got a great history of increasing dividends, a low payout ratio and because of it’s volatility you can periodically scoop it up at a great price.

First National is actually the company I have my mortgage with, and they aren’t your typical financial institution. They work closely with mortgage brokers, and leverage technology better than most of the big banks. I’m a big fan of their online mortgage platform, however the current interest rates, coupled with the increasing amount of Canadian Household Debt may hurt them. First National pays a nice monthly dividend, and insiders own over 10%, which is usually a sign that management has confidence in the business.

Let’s see what the numbers say. I included Bank Of Nova Scotia here as well for reference:

As you can see, all 3 are trading at very reasonable levels, with the edge going to Canadian Western Bank. The dividend yields are all pretty strong as well. The conservative payout ratio as well as the 5 year dividend growth rate also put Canadian Western Bank on top.

Bank of Nova Scotia is the easy set it and forget it pick. It has solid, but not spectacular numbers all around, and you know it will keep doing its thing.

First National has a few risks attached with it, if interest rates stay this low, they will get hurt more than other big banks, and the payout ratio of 78.6% is way too high for my liking (especially in this sector). I own some reits with better payout ratios!

Canadian Western Bank looks like the winner for me here. That said, I still don’t like it enough at it’s current price to pull the trigger. I’ve seen it dip below $20 many times over the last few years, and I expect it (along with most other stocks) will see another huge drop as Covid continues to wreak havoc on us. I love the dividend growth history, low payout ratio and their commitment to diversifying outside of Alberta, and also more into wealth management.

Long term, I don’t think you can go wrong with any of these, and here are my target prices:

BNS: $60 or less. Honestly it’s a good price now. It could drop again, but if you are in it for the long haul, getting this for 9-10x Earnings is a go for me

CWB: $19.99 or lower. Although I would never recommend swing trading – if you had to choose a stock to do it – this may be the one. This one continually goes from $20-$35. I like it for its dividend growth and low payout ratio. I’d be comfortable buying and holding for 5-10 years if I can scoop some up at $20 or less.

First National: $22.50. If I am being honest it’s probably a good price at $25-27 as well, but due to some of the risk, I’d only grab this one if it really falls quite heavily again.

2 Other stocks I want, but am waiting for price to drop …Alimentation Couche Tard & DOLLARAMA
It’s getting late, so I won’t go into these ones too much right now (i’ll probably do a solo write up on each). I am currently waiting for these two to drop to initiate a position.

I actually owned ATD.B previously, but sold it a couple years back, and although I made a nice chunk on that trade, I wish I held on to it. Dollarama is one that I’ve never owned but have wanted to for a while. These two stocks have a lot of similar metrics, both have extremely low yields, but both are growing them at exponential rates. They both have super conservative payout ratios, and have both seen their earnings and profits rise at “growth stock rates” for the last few years. That said, Dollarama has seen a pretty big drop in the rate of it’s growth the last 2 years while ATD has continued to impress. These are another two great stocks for the long haul, which I hope to add both by the end of this year. My target prices are:

Dollarama: $38.00
ATD.B: $40.00

Do you own any of these stocks? Would you consider buying any? Let me know your thoughts.

Cheers.

May 2020 Update: Dividends, Renovations & Bourbon

Dividend Income & Portfolio News

Personal Highlights – May 2020

  • 2 Years ago we thought we were going to sell the cabin because it was hard to enjoy with a 1 and 3 year old… but as the kids got older, we’ve really started enjoying it again.  We decided if we are going to keep it – we should finally make a few much needed changes.  We bought new beds, a new BBQ, brought a few new chairs out, and spent 2 full days ripping up the old carpet/flooring and putting new floors in.  It looks and feels like a whole new cabin.  Pic below:
    Cabin Floor Renovations
  • On the Covid front – our province is on “Phase 2” of reopening.  Most things are open now, although strict guidelines are still in place.  I haven’t yet gone to any restaurants or malls or anything.  Although I have made a couple trips to the hardware store.  We’ve been really lucky so far in Manitoba *knock on wood* with under 300 confirmed cases since the pandemic started.
  • The liquor mart got their yearly supply of my favourite bourbon that they carry so I stocked up.  It only comes in once or twice a year, and always sells out, so I need to make sure I stock up when it is available:)
    Liquor Mart
  • If I am being completely honest, between Covid, and the protests happening down south, I have lost quite a bit of interest in stocks, sports, etc.  I find myself refreshing twitter, reading articles, and going down the rabbit hole reading comments or arguing with people.  On the one hand I feel like I need to take a break from it for my own mental health, but on the other hand this is too important to just ignore/take a break.
  • I’m going to keep this short this month. Truth be told, I feel kind of like a Jackass even writing a dividend report/blog update with everything going on in the world right now, but it keeps my mind busy.  I hate that we even have to say #blacklivesmatter.  How fucked up is that? Seriously – think about that for a second. How did we let it get to this?  Silence and status quo I think is the biggest factor.  If you see or hear something racist, sexist, homophobic – please do your part and call that shit out.  It won’t be easy, it will be uncomfortable, but it needs to be done.
  • Financial Highlights for May:

  • Continued bi weekly contributions into TFSA, Wife’s TFSA & Spousal RRSP
  • May is usually a slow month, not many dividends paid.  The good news is there were no cuts/suspensions this month.
  • I was paid dividends from 5 companies, and 1 funds this month.  I dripped a total of 43 new shares/units.
  • Even though I had to take a temporary pay cut, my spending has been way down, which has more than made up for the temporary cut.  I guess it is easy to increase your savings rate when you can’t go out anywhere…haha
  • Next month XAW pays its semi annual dividend.  This should give my income a nice boost. They haven’t announced their distribution yet, and I assume it will be lower than last year due to Covid, but it should still hopefully work out to over $1000.

Passive Income Update For May 2020.

TFSA’S:

Diversified Royalty: $22.62(dripped 13 shares)

Artis Reit: $28.22 (dripped 3 shares)

Power Corp: $98.90 (dripped 4 shares)

Interrent Reit: $4.29

Plaza Reit: $29.68 (dripped 10 shares)

TFSA’s Total: $183.73

RRSP:

Canadian Equity Income Distribution: $352(dripped 13.845 shares)

Total Passive Income May 2020:  $535.73

Portfolio Update:

My portfolio was up slightly to: $334,531.46  This represents a increase of 1.62% from last month. I expect continued volatility in the market (and my portfolio) for the foreseeable future.

My long term plan hasn’t changed. I haven’t sold a single stock, and I continue to look for good deals.  I’ve updated my watchlist, I am currently keeping an eye on: Manulife, First National Bank, Alimentation Couche Tard, Metro and Canadian Western Bank (among a few others).

Passive income in May was $535.73 This is one of my slowest months, but luckily it should be followed by one of my largest.  Next month XAW pays one of it’s semi annual distributions.  With everything that has gone on in the market, I am not too sure how much to expect from XAW but it should be a much needed boost.

Assuming no dividend cuts or increases, my current Forward 12 month dividend income is $11,340.46.

Stay safe!

Cheers.

 

Stock Review: Canadian Natural Resources

Canadian Natural Stock Review

Canadian Natural Resources: A Blue-Chip Canadian Dividend Stock

*** The following is a guest post (Our first official guest post to be exact) from our good friends at Sure Dividend ***

At Sure Dividend, we don’t use the term blue-chip loosely. While the term blue-chip gets thrown around a lot in the financial media, we have a specific definition of what constitutes a blue-chip stock. Blue-chips, in our view, are stocks that have at least 10+ consecutive years of annual dividend increases. There are three specific groups of stocks that fall into the category of blue-chip stocks: the Dividend Achievers (10+ consecutive years); the Dividend Aristocrats (25+ consecutive years); and the Dividend Kings (50+ consecutive years).

We believe blue-chip stocks are those that have maintained long histories of raising their dividends each year. A long track record of consistent annual dividend growth indicates a company with strong brands, durable competitive advantages, and a proven history of generating growth over the long run.

Canadian Natural Resources (CNQ) qualifies as a blue-chip dividend stock for Sure Dividend, as the company has now increased its dividend for 20 consecutive years. We also consider the stock to be undervalued, given the recent and significant decline in the share price. With a high current yield above 8%, Canadian Natural Resources is a blue-chip dividend stock.

Business Overview & Recent Events

Canadian Natural Resources is an energy company that operates in the acquisition, exploration, development, production, marketing, and sale of crude oil, natural gas liquids (NGLs), and natural gas. Geographic areas of production focus include Western Canada, the North Sea, and offshore Africa. The company is headquartered in Calgary, Alberta, and the common stock is cross listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange and the New York Stock Exchange, where it trades with a market capitalization of approximately US$17 billion.
The company has high-quality assets that will fuel its growth for many years. It has a massive asset base of long-life, low-decline assets which hold 27.8 years of proved reserves, and 36.0 years of reserve life based on proved-plus-probable reserves. Canadian Natural’s Oil Sands Mining and Upgrading assets have a reserve life of more than 43 years.
As a large exploration and production company, Canadian Natural Resources’ revenue and cash flow are dependent in part on the underlying commodity price. Reduced prices of oil and gas due to the negative demand shock posed by the coronavirus has put a dent in the oil and gas majors. Fortunately, Canadian Natural Resources has continued to perform well in recent periods.

In early March, Canadian Natural Resources reported financial results for the fourth quarter of fiscal 2019. In the year, average production grew 2%. In addition, the company reduced its operating costs by -10%, to $11.50 per barrel, and thus grew its adjusted earnings-per-share by 17%, from $2.06 to $2.40. Moreover, the company grew its adjusted funds flow by 13%, to an all-time high of $10.3 billion, and delivered record free cash flows of $4.6 billion.

Such a strong level of free cash flow permitted the company to return lots of cash to shareholders last year. Shareholder returns totaled $2.7 billion for 2019, including a 12% increase in the company’s quarterly dividend and over $940 million in share repurchases.

Canadian Natural Resources grew its reserves by 11% in 2019, to 10.99 billion barrels, and thus enhanced its reserve life index to 27.8 years. As this figure is more than twice as much as the average life of reserves of its peers (~11 years), it is impressive and certainly bodes well for the future growth prospects of the company.

Dividend Analysis

In early 2020, Canadian Natural Resources declared a new quarterly dividend at a rate of $0.425 per share, for an annualized rate of $1.70 per share (US$1.21). This represented a 13% raise from the previous quarterly payout, meaning 2020 is the 20th consecutive year of a dividend increase for Canadian Natural Resources. This is an impressive history of increasing dividends, as it includes the global financial crisis and recession of 2008-2009, as well as the coronavirus pandemic.

Canadian Natural Resources is a high dividend stock, and is an attractive stock for income investors. Based on its recent share price, the stock has a high dividend yield of 8.6%. Compare this with the S&P 500 Index, which has an average dividend yield just above 2% right now. The combination of rising stock markets over much of the past decade, as well as falling interest rates, means it is more difficult to find suitable levels of investment income considering the lack of available alternatives.

The company has decent balance sheet strength as well, with an investment-grade credit rating of BBB from Standard & Poor’s. Canadian Natural Resources recently notified investors of recent developments surrounding the coronavirus crisis, and measures taken to protect the company’s financial position in an effort to secure the dividend. In 2019, Canadian Natural retired approximately $2.35 billion of bonds and term facilities, proving to be a wise decision as the global economy faces a potential recession in 2020.

Canadian Natural Resources has taken a number of steps to shore up its finances more recently, including suspending buybacks and cutting operating costs. Management is also confident regarding the liquidity position of the company. Current liquidity is approximately $5 billion consisting of cash, including approximately $1 billion in estimated cash reserves as at March 31st . Lastly, it is lowering its 2020 capital expenditure budget from $4.05 billion to $2.96 billion, a 27% reduction. In the company’s
view, its financial resources are more than sufficient to retire any current debt obligations when due.

Final Thoughts

The coronavirus crisis has weighed on the stock market over the past several weeks, particularly in the hardest-hit sectors such as energy. But this could simply be a good buying opportunity for long-term investors. There are many high-quality stocks that have seen their dividend yields rise dramatically as a result of their plunging share prices. And, valuations appear compressed across the energy sector.

Still, investors need to choose stocks selectively, to focus on high-quality businesses with sustainable dividends. Canadian Natural Resources has a strong business model and a long history of increasing its dividend each year. With a high dividend yield above 8%, Canadian Natural Resources is a blue-chip dividend stock.

 

** Just a reminder, this was a guest post from our friends at Sure Dividend. **

Always do your own stock research.

Cheers!

April: Saying Goodbye, Dividends, Birthdays & A Podcast

Dividend Income & Portfolio News

Personal Highlights – April 2020

  • Let’s get the bad news out of the way first.  We had to say goodbye to our sweet dog Penny this month.  She was a beautiful girl, with a gentle soul.  She lived a long, happy life and graced us with so many memories.  I even proposed to my wife with the dog (as a surprise) almost 12 years ago.  Here are a few of my favourite pics of Penny:
  • Losing a pet is never easy – it’s even worse when you are in the middle of a global pandemic with two toddlers at home.  The kids have handled it pretty well so far.  Every now and then they(we) have a cry and remember the good times with Penny.
  • Onto some less depressing news.  The weather has finally started warming up, so we have been able to get out into the back yard and stretch our legs a bit more.  Isaac just had his 3rd birthday, and got a lot of outdoor/yard toys.  I expect the next few days will be spent almost entirely in the backyard playing with new toys, kicking a ball around and of course drinking some cold beers.
  • I was a guest on a podcast for the first time ever. I had a great time, and although it’s clear it was my first time..i’d definitely do it again. It was the FI_Garage podcast.  The guys sit around, drink beer and talk about investing.  What’s not to love.  You can check it out HERE
  • I started re-watching Parks & Recreation with the wife since she has never seen it. If you haven’t ever seen it – do yourself a favour and check it out. It streams on Amazon prime.
  • I posted some hopefully possible positives that could come from the Covid 19 pandemic.  You can read that post HERE
  • My little man turned 3 on April 28.  Although we couldn’t get the family and friends together for a big party, we had some people drop by with presents, and still spoiled him with pizza and ice cream cake.  Here’s a few of our favourite photos of our little baby boy…I cannot believe he is 3 already!Isaac J Maas
  • Financial Highlights for April:

  • Continued bi weekly contributions into TFSA, Wife’s TFSA & Spousal RRSP
  • Took a temporary pay cut at work due to Covid.  It’s hard to complain when so many people have lost their jobs. We are lucky in the sense we can both work from home, and are at least saving some costs on daycare for the time being.  That said, we miss our daycare family so much and cannot wait until the kids can go back.
  • Our variable mortgage rate dropped, which ends up saving us about $200 per month.
  • Since the Covid pandemic, I have received dividend suspensions from CAE and Chorus Aviation. I ‘ve also received  dividend cuts from: Diversified Royalty & New Flyer Group.  I expect my distributions from XAW & RBC Canadian Equity Income fund to be lower than expected as well.
  • I was paid dividends from 9 companies, and 1 funds this month.  I dripped a total of 86 new shares/units.  These reduced prices have caused a huge spike in dripped shares per month. SIX double digit drips this month!
  • Portfolio increased over $42,000 month over month, and is now back to the same level it was at in August. I don’t understand this market. I feel like we are in for another big drop…but I also thought it would have happened already, so who knows.

Passive Income Update For April 2020.

TFSA’S:

Diversified Royalty: $26.00(dripped 18 shares)

Artis Reit: $28.08 (dripped 3 shares)

Algonquin Power: $185.31 (dripped 10 shares)

Interrent Reit: $4.29

Plaza Reit: $29.44 (dripped 10 shares)

Chorus Aviation: $36.76(dripped 12 shares)

TFSA’s Total: $309.88

RRSP:

Canadian Equity Income Distribution: $351(dripped 13 shares)

Transcontinental: $192.83 (dripped 16 shares)

New Flyer: $57.16(dripped 4 shares)

Go Easy: $123.75

Total Passive Income April 2020:  $1034.62

Portfolio Update:

My portfolio jumped back up to: $329,207.77.  This represents a increase of 14.78% from last month. This market is crazy.  Over the last 3 months, my portfolio has gone:
– 5.41%, -19.73%, +14.78%

My long term plan hasn’t changed. I haven’t sold a single stock, and I continue to look for good deals.  I’ve updated my watchlist, I am currently keeping an eye on: Manulife, First National Bank, Alimentation Couche Tard, Metro and Canadian Western Bank (among a few others).

Passive income in April was $1034.62.  This was the second time in the first 4 months of 2020 my income was over a thousand!  I only achieved $1000+ twice in all of 2019!

Stay safe!

Cheers.